INFECTION CONTROL

Hand Washing Instructions

• Prepare to wash hands.

• Keep uniform or clothing from touching sink. Micro-organisms may be transmitted from sink to uniform.

• Turn tap on and adjust water flow to moderate flow, warm temperature.

• Moderate flow prevents micro-organism spreading by splashing. Warm water removes less protective oil from skin.

• Wet forearms & hands.

• Hold forearm and hands lower than elbow.

• Allow water to flow from mid-forearm to fingertips.

• Water should flow from least contaminated to most contaminated (hand) area.

• Apply soap agent.

• Apply soap agent to palms of hands (2-4 ml of liquid). If bar soap, rinse the soap bar before returning it to soap dish. Rinsing bar soap removes micro-organisms.

• Wash forearms & hands.

• Starting at the top of each forearm; stop at wrist; then continue with each hand – use firm, rubbing, circular movements to work up a lather. Rub the back of each hand using a rotary motion. Interlace the fingers and thumbs, and move hands back and forth.

• Do not touch sink with any part of hands.

• If the sink is touched, repeat hand washing.

• Rinse forearms & hands.

• With fingertips down, starting at the top of the forearm, rotate one arm at a time under water so that water flows from lathered area of forearm to fingertips.

• Dry forearms & hands.

• Use clean paper towels to thoroughly dry hands, from forearms to fingertips, and discard in appropriate container.

• Use a clean paper towel to turn off taps and wipe surrounding sink surfaces.

• Discard towel in appropriate container.

NOTES:

Water should flow from least contaminated to most contaminated (hands) area.

Hands are more contaminated than forearms.

Moist skin becomes chapped, and chapping breaks skin surface, which can result in an infection.

Most hand washing is for a minimum of 30-60 seconds if washing for the first time when coming on shift. If an extended time is needed repeat “Rinse hands” sections.


4 Moments for Hand Hygiene

Hand Hygiene

1. Before Contact with Client or Client’s Environment

Why? To protect the client against harmful germs carried on your hands

Example: Before touching/starting a procedure with client

2. Before Clean/Aseptic Procedure

Why? To protect the client against harmful germs from entering their body

Example: Before handling clean supplies (e.g. skincare tools & tattoo supplies)

3. After Body Fluid Exposure Risk

Why? To protect yourself and the health care environment from harmful germs

Example: After an invasive procedure (e.g. microblading, tattooing)

4. After Contact with Client or Client’s Environment

Why? To protect yourself and the health care environment from harmful germs

Example: After providing service for client


Cleanliness & Sanitation

Proper cleanliness and sanitization is vital to protect your client and yourself. Although cleanliness may seem like common sense, the treatments being preformed, the type of equipment being used and the potential pathogens you may come into contact with will impact the sterilization and disinfection techniques required. Your clients rely on your and knowledge and and professionalism to protect them, protect yourself and abide by the laws in your territory. If you have not done so already, a Bloodborne Pathogens certification is recommended. Estheticians must be cognizant of contagious bacteria, fungi, parasites, and viruses that can be transferred and pose a serious health risk. Wearing gloves every time there is potential contact with a client’s blood, bodily fluids, secretions, non-intact skin, and mucous membrane is a standard precaution. Always assume that any blood and bodily fluids are potential sources of infection such as staph, Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus (MRSA) infection (caused by a strain of staph bacteria resistant to antibiotics commonly used to treat ordinary staph infections), hepatitis, and even HIV.

All tools that come into contact with blood or body fluids must be disinfected in an Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) registered tuberculocidal disinfectant (a disinfectant that kills HIV 1 and hepatitis B virus).